Pediatrician Office

Pediatrician Spring , Tomball, & Willis, TX

Champions Pediatric Associates - Spring

Spring, TX Pediatrician
Champions Pediatric Associates
18607 Kuykendahl Rd.
Spring, TX 77379

(281) 370-1122
(281) 370-1139 fax

Office Hours
Monday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday:08:30 AM - Noon
Sunday:Closed


Champions Pediatric Associates - Tomball

25201 Kuykendahl Rd.
Suite 650
Tomball, TX 77375
(281) 370-1122

Office Hours
Monday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday:Closed
Sunday:Closed


Champions Pediatric Associates - Willis

10292 FM 1097 W.
Willis, TX 77318
(281) 370-1122

Office Hours
Monday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday:08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday:Closed
Sunday:Closed


Payment Options

Cash, Checks and all major credit cards accepted.


Facilities and Equipment

  • Free Prenatal consultation
  • Separate well/sick waiting rooms
  • Professional ear piercing
  • Spirometry


Hospital Affiliations

  • Methodist Willowbrook Hospital
  • Houston Northwest
  • Memorial Hermann, Woodlands
  • St. Lukes Episcopal Hospital, Woodlands

Our Location

Find us on the map

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Spring Office

Monday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Tomball & Willis Office

Monday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is in the family of coronaviruses that is often the cause of the "common cold." However, in 2019 a Novel version of this virus was detected in Wuhan, China, now called COVID-19. COVID-19 spreads from person to person or via surfaces. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, tiny droplets containing the virus are released into the air and immediate surroundings. It is possible for an uninfected person to get COVID-19 infection by directly coming into contact with these droplets or by touching surfaces or objects affected by these droplets and then touching his or her mouth, nose or eyes.

Does CDC have resources on how to treat and care for patients with COVID-19?

Yes, the CDC has several resources. Factors that may help guide the assessment of a patient with COVID-19 includes assessing their travel history, current symptoms, as well being aware of the epidemiology of COVID-19 in your local community.

What is the treatment available for COVID-19? Is there a vaccine?

Treatment is mainly supportive care. There is currently no vaccine available to prevent COVID-19 but vaccines are being tested and there has been recruitment for an experimental vaccine in the state of Washington. The NIH also currently has a clinical trial investigating the use of certain medication to treat COVID-19.

How can I protect my family?
Prevention is Key!

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Follow CDC's recommendations for using a facemask.
    • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
    • Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.